Posts Tagged ‘Atonement’

Genesis 32:1720 – HOW TO HANDLE THE GREATEST CONFLICT OF ALL

Instructions in Diplomatic Integrity – Part 8

Jacob is preparing to come face to face with Esau. The meeting could be explosive. (see part 1-7). How do you prepare to meet with someone who is suspicious of your motives?

  1. ANTICIPATE THE QUESTIONS THAT WILL BE RAISED

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Anticipate Loaded Questions – I have used the Knotted Gun Sculpture by Carl Fredrik Reuterswärd and adjusted it to look like a question mark (Ross Cochrane).

He gave these instructions to the men leading the first group: “When my brother, Esau, meets you, he will ask, ‘Whose servants are you? Where are you going? Who owns these animals?’ You must reply, ‘They belong to your servant Jacob, but they are a gift for his master Esau. Look, he is coming right behind us’” (Genesis 32:17-18 NLT).  

Jacob anticipates the questions that Esau will ask and gets in ahead with the answers. This is a well-researched, well-managed exercise, taking every possibility into account. Esau is expecting Jacob behind every herd. Jacob is in last place this time, not first.

Did God command Jacob to do this? No. There is no record that this is directly commanded by God, but his plan appears to be a result of having been with God in prayer.

Jacob gave the same instructions to the second and third herdsmen and to all who followed behind the herds: “You must say the same thing to Esau when you meet him(Genesis 32:19 NLT). The message will be repeated a number of times.

And be sure to say, ‘Look, your servant Jacob is right behind us.’” Jacob thought, “I will try to APPEASE him by sending gifts ahead of me. When I see him in person, perhaps he will be friendly to me” (Genesis 32:20 NLT). 

This is not a deceptive strategy, but very straightforward, open and honest.

Yes, it is true that Jacob is trying to appease Esau. Apparently, the word “Appease” means “to pacify, to make an atonement, to make reconciliation”. Literally “to cover his face” and it has the idea that Esau can no longer see Jacob’s shame.

He offers a gift to make atonement and recompense for a rift in a relationship. Some have said that this implies that Jacob makes peace with God by reconciling with Esau.

Jesus said in Matthew 5:22-24 (NLT) if you are presenting a sacrifice at the altar in the Temple and you suddenly remember that someone has something against you, leave your sacrifice there at the altar. Go and be reconciled to that person. Then come and offer your sacrifice to God.”  

It has taken twenty years. He didn’t exactly go straight away, but at least Jacob is doing something now.

The stress of conflict can easily consume us and have an impact on all our relationships. What can Jacob teach us about this? (See Part 9…)

Pastor Ross

Genesis 32:13-16 – HOW TO HANDLE THE GREATEST CONFLICT OF ALL

Instructions in Diplomatic Integrity – Part 7

Jacob is preparing to come face to face with Esau. The meeting could be explosive because Esau lost respect for Jacob a long time ago. (see part 1-6).

So how does Jacob prepare for this confrontation? How can you convince someone to meet with you when you have lost respect in their eyes?

  1. MAKE IT EASY FOR THE OTHER PERSON TO COME TO THE TABLE

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© Flowers of Atonement, by Ross Cochrane

Jacob stayed where he was for the night. Then he selected these gifts from his possessions to present to his brother, Esau:(Genesis 32:13 NLT).  

After prayer, Jacob didn’t fall to pieces but sought to make it easy for Esau to talk. To avoid triggering further conflict Jacob sets about giving recompense for the deception he used so many years ago when he stole the birthright and blessing from Esau.

Now he is getting things right with his brother without compromising on the promises of God. The aftermath of failures can be used by God to grant success. Perhaps this is why God has blessed him materially. So that he could make restitution to Esau, with interest.

Some accuse Jacob of trying to buy Esau’s favor, but it’s always easy to be suspicious of his motives when an olive branch is extended. He has just been in prayer. This is more likely to be a response from the time he has spent with God.

200 female goats, 20 male goats, 200 ewes, 20 rams, 15 30 female camels with their young, 40 cows, 10 bulls, 20 female donkeys, and 10 male donkeys(Genesis 32:14-15 NLT).  

This is a fortune but Jacob has a moral obligation. He is being exceptionally generous but these animals were never really meant for him. All these animals are valuable but restitution is due. Jacob shows Esau that he respects and cares about the unrealised issues in their relationship that may still be important to him.

He divided these animals into herds and assigned each to different servants. Then he told his servants, “Go ahead of me with the animals, but keep some distance between the herds”(Genesis 32:16 NLT).

He decides to drip-feed the animals to Esau, one herd at a time. Wave after wave of gifts. He’s not running away, but making it easy for his brother to come to the negotiating table.

God’s blessings to Jacob become Esau’s gift of restoration. So much of that with which we are blessed is not meant for us but is for giving away to others. So often our response to God’s material blessings are put to the test. Are we willing to let them go?

What if Esau is suspicious of Jacob’s motives like so many commentators have been? (Find out. Read Part 8. Coming soon).

Pastor Ross